Graphenea, Nokia and IEMN-CNRS collaborate to create high-frequency graphene transistors on flexible substrates

Feb 21, 2017

Scientists from IEMN-CNRS, Graphenea, and Nokia have demonstrated flexible graphene transistors with a record high cut-off frequency of 39 GHz. The graphene devices, made on flexible polymer substrates, are stable against bending and fatigue of repeated flexing.

Graphenea and Nokia create impressive GFET image

The graphene field effect transistor (GFET) is made from high quality CVD grown graphene with a carrier mobility of ~2500 cm2 V-1 s-1 on a flexible Kapton substrate with a thin alumina dielectric spacer in the channel region. The use of such sophisticated and optimized materials leads to the record high frequency performance as well as stability against bending. The GFET reportedly continues to operate even after 1,000 bending cycles and can be flexed to a radius of 12 mm with a cutoff frequency shift of up to 10%.

A novel doping method could open the door to FLG use as transparent conducting electrodes

Feb 15, 2017

Researchers from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), in collaboration with the Georgia Institute of Technology, have recently demonstrated a simple, solution-based, method for surface doping of few-layer graphene (FLG) using novel dopants (metal-organic molecules) that show a minimal effect on the optical transmission as compared to other dopants like metal chlorides.

This work investigates the effect of dopant strength and dosage on the electronic and electrical transport properties of doped FLG. Moreover, It reveals fundamental differences between the doping results in single layer graphene and few-layer graphene. The study focused on few-layer CVD graphene, rather than single-layer CVD graphene, a somewhat less common area of research to date.

Rice team's CNT-reinforced graphene foam is conductive and strong

Feb 14, 2017

Researchers at Rice University have constructed a graphene foam, reinforced by carbon nanotubes, that can support more than 3,000 times its own weight and bounce back to its original height. In addition, its shape and size are easily controlled - which the team demonstrated by creating a screw-shaped piece of the material.

Rice's graphene-CNTs foam is strong and conductive

The 3D structures were created from a powdered nickel catalyst, surfactant-wrapped multiwall nanotubes and sugar as a carbon source. The materials were mixed and the water evaporated; the resulting pellets were pressed into a steel die and then heated in a chemical vapor deposition furnace, which turned the available carbon into graphene. After further processing to remove remnants of nickel, the result was an all-carbon foam in the shape of the die, in this case a screw. The team said the method will be easy to scale up.

Graphenea announced price reductions

Jan 23, 2017

Graphenea logoGraphenea, a company focused on the production of high quality graphene for industrial applications, has announced a significant price reduction. The price of CVD films has dropped 15% on average this January, and the price of graphene oxide (GO) is being reduced by 30% on average.

CVD films are being offered on the copper substrates that they are grown on, in sizes ranging from 10x10 mm to 4 inch diameter. The same high quality graphene films are also available on SiO2/Si, quartz, PET, suspended on TEM grids and cavities, and on custom substrates as required. For customers wishing to do their own transfer, CVD graphene is also available on polymer films for easy transfer.

MIT team uses graphene to create ultra-strong 3D materials

Jan 08, 2017

Researchers at MIT have designed a strong and lightweight material, by compressing and fusing flakes of graphene. The new material, a sponge-like configuration with a density of just 5%, can have a strength 10 times that of steel. This work could pose an interesting way of transforming graphene into useful 3D objects and items.MIT created superstrong graphene 3D material image

The team developed the product by using a combination of both heat and pressure, compressing and fusing the flakes of graphene together. This process produced a strong, stable structure whose form resembles that of some corals and microscopic creatures called diatoms. These shapes, which have an enormous surface area in proportion to their volume, proved to be remarkably strong.