Talga Resources logo 2017

Talga Resources Ltd is a multi-national company focused on graphite mining and graphene supply and application development. The company mines graphite in Sweden, operates a test processing facility in Germany under Talga Advanced Materials GmbH and has a product development arm, Talga Technologies UK Ltd located in Cambridge, UK.

Talga is developing graphene products for additives to coatings, batteries, concrete and epoxy composites. Testing of Talga materials and products is underway with a range of corporations including industrial conglomerates Tata and BASF subsidiary Chemetall, UK listed Haydale, flexible battery maker Zinergy and German based Jena Batteries.

Talga Resources is a public company trading on the Australian Stock Exchange (ASX: TLG). In June 2016 the company raised $10 million in a placement.

Company Address: 
2 Richardson St
West Perth WA 6005
Australia



The latest Talga graphene news:

Talga to scale-up operations following positive battery anode product test results

Talga Resources logo 2017Talga Technologies is scaling up its R&D operations at the Bradfield Center on Cambridge Science Park. The reported that this move comes as tests showed that Talga’s Li-ion battery anode product, Talnode-C, outperforms existing lithium battery technology in cold weather situations, where lithium products have traditionally struggled.

“We make graphene and graphite materials,” says Talga Resources R&D manager, Sai Shivareddy. “Graphene is made by an electrochemical exfoliation process in an aqueous electrolyte – water plus salt – by using our natural graphite rocks in electrodes.”

Talga reports positive test results on its graphene silicon Li-ion battery anode project

Talga Resources has revealed new test results on the ongoing optimization of its graphene silicon Li-ion battery anode product, Talnode™- Si. According to Talga, the battery anode product returns further performance gains, now delivering ~70% more energy density than commercial graphite-only anodes.

ts graphene silicon Li-ion battery anode product, Talnode™- Si image

The product reportedly provides a “drop in” solution for improving current Li-ion battery performance. Commercial samples under confidentiality and material transfer agreements are scheduled to commence delivery around the end of February 2019 - recipients are said to include some of the world’s largest electronic corporations.

Talga enters agreement with Schunk for graphene-enhanced automotive product development

Talga Resources logo 2017Australia-based advanced materials technology company, Talga Resources, has announced that it has signed a Letter of Intent (“LOI”) with Schunk Carbon Technology, a subsidiary of the German Schunk Group.

Under the agreement, Talga and Schunk will co-operate on the exploration and incorporation of Talga graphene (Talphene) into a Schunk product with applications in the automotive sector. Further details of the LOI and application are being kept a secret at this stage.

Talga reports positive results on its graphene-enhanced epoxy composite trials

Australia-based advanced materials technology company, Talga Resources, has reported outstanding conductivity results from its Talphene-enhanced epoxy composite trials undertaken at TWI in the UK. Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (“CFRP”) panels were constructed using a dispersion of Talga graphene (Talphene) in the epoxy-based resin of the composite and subjected to a range of conductivity tests pertinent to aircraft applications.

Talga reports positive results on its graphene-enhanced epoxy composite trials imageCFRP test panels after lightning strike tests (Talphene panel on right in both photos). Image by Talga

Results reported by Talga showed the Talphene panel provided similar lightning strike protection as copper mesh panels currently used in composite aircraft but saved 75% of the weight of the copper. Further results demonstrating Talphene’s significant conductivity included up to 500% increase in dielectric constant, 100% increase in resin thermal conductivity as well as spot temperatures well over 100 degrees celsius in anti-icing trials.

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