Talga and Mitsui collaborate on battery anode project

Battery and advanced materials company Talga is working with Mitsui & Co. Europe, a subsidiary of Mitsui, one of the largest global trading and investment companies based in Japan.

The MOU between the Companies, planned to take place until 31 August 2022, is based on the intent to advance potential co-development of Talga's Vittangi Anode Project in Sweden through a Joint Venture, and is expanded to include marketing, sales and partnership opportunities across Talga’s portfolio of lithium-ion battery products.

Graphene-Info's top 10 graphene applications of 2021

2021 has been a challenging year, globally, with the pandemic still not behind us, and a dramatic component shortage effecting many markets. The graphene industry, however, had an excellent year, with new products on the market and increased material production and adoption.

Here are 2021's top ten graphene applications, ranked by the references at Graphene-Info:

  1. Batteries
  2. Medicine
  3. Sensors
  4. Automotive applications
  5. Composites
  6. Supercapacitors
  7. Coating
  8. Textiles
  9. Electronics
  10. Construction materials

GMG sends graphene aluminium-ion batteries to customers for testing

Graphene Manufacturing Group (GMG) has announced that its graphene aluminium-ion batteries ("G+AI Battery") 2032 type coin cell prototypes have been sent to a number of prospective customers around the world.

GMG reports that coin cell testing to date has demonstrated that the GMG 2032 type G+AI Battery coin cell prototypes are fully rechargeable in several seconds, retain capacity for several thousand charge and discharge cycles, are non-flammable, and are relatively non-toxic and almost fully recyclable. These characteristics compare favorably against typical rechargeable Lithium-Ion 2032 type coin cells which take 3-6 hours to recharge, are toxic and can be quite harmful if ingested, are difficult to recycle, are flammable under certain conditions, and degrade more rapidly in performance.

Sparc Technologies reports successfull testing of graphene-enhanced epoxy coatings

In 2020 Sparc Technologies acquired Graphene Technology Solutions (GTS) and announced plans to become a “significant developer of graphene-based products".

Sparc announced today that after six months of testing, its graphene-based additives was found to offer up to 40% improvement in the anti-corrosive performance of atmospheric epoxy coatings. The company used commercially available epoxy coatings available from leading coatings manufacturers.

Researchers stabilize the edges of graphene nanoribbons and measure their magnetic properties

Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and UC Berkeley have developed a method to stabilize the edges of graphene nanoribbons and directly measure their unique magnetic properties.

The team, co-led by Felix Fischer and Steven Louie from Berkeley Lab’s Materials Sciences Division, found that by substituting some of the carbon atoms along the ribbon’s zigzag edges with nitrogen atoms, they could discretely tune the local electronic structure without disrupting the magnetic properties. This subtle structural change further enabled the development of a scanning probe microscopy technique for measuring the material’s local magnetism at the atomic scale.

New graphene-based neural probes improve detection of epileptic brain signals

Researchers the UK and Spain have demonstrated that tiny graphene neural probes can be used safely to improve our understanding of the causes of epilepsy.

The graphene depth neural probe (gDNP) consists of a millimeter-long linear array of micro-transistors imbedded in a micrometer-thin polymeric flexible substrate. The transistors were developed by a collaboration between The University of Manchester’s Neuromedicine Lab and UCL’s Institute of Neurology along with their Graphene Flagship partners.

Researchers develop graphene-biosensors for brain machine interfaces

Researchers at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) have developed a novel graphene-based biosensor, set to drive new innovations in brain-controlled robotics.

The biosensor adheres to the skin of the face and head in order to detect electrical signals being sent by the brain. These signals can be translated into commands to control autonomous robotic systems. The sensor, made of epitaxial graphene grown onto a silicon carbide on silicon substrate, overcomes the major challenges of corrosion, durability and skin-contact resistance.

Latvia invests in project to develop graphene-enhanced ballistic protective vest

Latvia has allocated $1.4 million divided between three innovative projects that aim to improve electromagnetic protection and cybersecurity and to develop a ballistic protective vest to protect UAVs.

The project for a prototype of a ballistic protective vest will feature a pressure-sensitive layer with graphene and silicon aerogel for accurate reception of impact. This effort has been awarded funding of €449,000 ($508,000).

Researchers examine the mechanism of electric field detection in microscale graphene sensors

Researchers at Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST) and Otowa Electric, a lightning protection equipment manufacturer, have used graphene as an electric field sensor that can detect both positive and negative electric fields.

Revisiting the Mechanism of Electric Field Sensing in Graphene Devices image

The response of the sensor is recorded as the change in drain current under the application of an electric field. In addition, by systematic analysis, The team established the mechanism of the graphene electric field sensor, which was found to be different from what they expected.